Being Vinnie Zillah

Protest against the death of #EricGarner begins. He died recently after being placed in a chokehold by an NYPD offi…

lookpeople:

liberalisnotadirtyword:

Melissa Harris-Perry: Nothing is riskier than being poor in America [full video]

Have I put this up on my blog before?

Fuck it, here it is again.

Always reblog.

darvinasafo:

Spike Lee’s memorial for Eric Garner

darvinasafo:

Spike Lee’s memorial for Eric Garner

urbangeographies:

British Headquarters Map of New York, 1782
This faithful copy of the British Headquarters Map of New York of 1782, compiled from the original by BF Stevens and published in limited numbers in 1900, is located in the David Rumsey Map Collection. The British Army created this map during its occupation of New York City during the American Revolution. When I saw the original in an exhibition at the City Museum of New York City, I was amazed at the map’s size and detail:  comprised of a series of 24 sheets, the full mounted wall map stretched 10 feet wide by 4 feet high. This detailed military map shows the locations of natural features, such as salt marshes, streams, hills, and woods, which army cartographers considered important obstacles to soldiers as they traveled the island.
It was this map that Eric Sanderson came across as he was beginning to work on the “Mannahatta Project” to recreate the island’s ecology in 1609, when Henry Hudson first sailed into New York Bay and up the river that now bears his name. The map was an important discovery because of the degree of topographic detail and range of natural features it depicts. For instance, the map even shows what type of trees grew in a stand — green triangular shapes represent evergreens while rounded tufts represent deciduous trees. No other map of Manhattan Island from this era depicts so many natural features in such detail. The online version of this map available in the David Rumsey Map Collection includes a useful “zoom” device to change the scale. A fascinating historical document for those of us with urban, landscape, and environmental interests!

urbangeographies:

British Headquarters Map of New York, 1782

This faithful copy of the British Headquarters Map of New York of 1782, compiled from the original by BF Stevens and published in limited numbers in 1900, is located in the David Rumsey Map Collection. The British Army created this map during its occupation of New York City during the American Revolution. When I saw the original in an exhibition at the City Museum of New York City, I was amazed at the map’s size and detail:  comprised of a series of 24 sheets, the full mounted wall map stretched 10 feet wide by 4 feet high. This detailed military map shows the locations of natural features, such as salt marshes, streams, hills, and woods, which army cartographers considered important obstacles to soldiers as they traveled the island.

It was this map that Eric Sanderson came across as he was beginning to work on the “Mannahatta Project” to recreate the island’s ecology in 1609, when Henry Hudson first sailed into New York Bay and up the river that now bears his name. The map was an important discovery because of the degree of topographic detail and range of natural features it depicts. For instance, the map even shows what type of trees grew in a stand — green triangular shapes represent evergreens while rounded tufts represent deciduous trees. No other map of Manhattan Island from this era depicts so many natural features in such detail. The online version of this map available in the David Rumsey Map Collection includes a useful “zoom” device to change the scale. A fascinating historical document for those of us with urban, landscape, and environmental interests!

Lil Kim in a… is it a ski suit?

Lil Kim in a… is it a ski suit?

"Aaliyah on a computer"

"Aaliyah on a computer"

Stop Censorship Now